New Insights on Innovation and Creativity

Greetings. Looking for new ideas and insights on innovation and creativity? If so, the “Innovation & Creativity Summit 2017” might be a valuable (and free) resource. Organized by UK consultant Nick Skillicorn, the Summit is a collection of 45 thoughtful conversations with global innovation leaders…each with their own unique perspective on how to unlock brilliant ideas and bring them to market successfully.

Let’s face it, innovation is essential if our companies and organizations are to remain vibrant and relevant. But it is also hard to do, especially in established companies and organizations. In fact, more than 90% of all new ideas fail. Not only that, recent studies have shown that most people do not consider themselves to be creative and that people are becoming less creative than they were only a couple of decades ago. Kind of a scary thought given all of the tools, resources, and technology at our disposal. But you and your colleagues can improve the odds of innovation success dramatically…or at least do a better job of picking opportunities…by understanding how the best ideas actually happen, how to rediscover your own innate creativity, and by learning from others who have cracked the code.

Here is a short introductory video that will give you a better sense of what the Summit is all about in case it might be of interest…

And in the interest of full disclosure, I am glad to say that I am part of this online event, and that I will be sharing some of my latest ideas on the necessity of strangers, the “99% rule,” and the power of exploring the world around us in order to discover new connections that can spark our best thinking.

In terms of logistics, the Summit will run from April 2nd to April 11th, and each of the 45 sessions will be available at no cost for three of those days. My session will be up and running (for free) from April 3rd through April 5th. And once you sign up, you will get a schedule with all of the sessions and topics. You will also have the option of purchasing unlimited access to all of the sessions until the end of time, or at least some date in the distant future, at what appears to be a pretty darn reasonable price. And if you decide to watch my session, I would welcome your feedback and your latest thinking about innovation as I am continually trying to get way smarter.

Cheers!

Getting “Out of the Box”

Greetings. While I am keen on the importance of strangers in our work and lives, I have a bit of an aversion to the popular notion of thinking “out-of-the-box” as the key to greater creativity and innovation. Yet it is still a widely-used phrase in companies and organizations that are trying to figure out how to think and act in new ways. My biggest concern is that too many businesses believe that simply calling for “out-of-the-box” ideas, often accompanied by a “suggestion box,” will create a veritable landslide of brilliance as employees suddenly feel liberated to suggest amazing possibilities for new products, services, solutions, customer experiences, and new ways of doing the things that matter most.

If only it were that simple.

As we all know, coming up with (and implementing) the right new ideas takes strategic focus, real discipline and commitment, curiosity, humility, a willingness to take calculated risks and make some mistakes, a sense of urgency, and a culture that is truly open to learning, fresh thinking, new perspectives, and the insights of people and places that are very different.

Having said this, and in the spirit of trying to be as open-minded as possible given that some things are just plain weird, I must admit that a recent feature in the New York Times challenged me to be a bit less critical of “out-of-the-box” thinking…or at least one particular example. The article in question was about a remarkable innovation in the world of funerals in which the star of the show (a.k.a., the “deceased”) is able to attend their own service in a favorite setting or pose. Settings that include sitting at the kitchen table surrounded by favorite possessions or important life symbols like a bottle of Jack Daniels, being dressed like Che Guevara with a cigar hand, sitting behind the steering wheel of an ambulance, sitting atop a favorite motorcycle, or standing up dressed as a boxer in the corner of a boxing ring.

Yes, even I must admit that this seems to represent a new and graphic way of getting “out of the box” (or out of a specific type of box).

According to the Times, this new approach to funerals first appeared in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and has now become increasingly popular in places like New Orleans…which doesn’t seem like a big surprise. And its growing popularity might even suggest a world of untapped creativity aimed at making us look as fantastic as possible until closing time. It even brought back memories of the passing of my favorite great uncle who had just returned to Boston after spending the winter in Florida. Upon seeing his tan self, one of his closest friends remarked: “The winter by the beach did him a world of good!” Not exactly. But as Billy Crystal use to say on Saturday Night Live, “It is better to look good than to feel good.”

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Which begs the question of how all of us might conspire to reinvent our industries in ways that get us out of the traditional context in which we offer value to our customers. And how we might do an even better job of customizing our offerings to the unique needs, desires, and personalities of those we have the privilege to serve so they can look as good as possible.

We win in business and in life when we seek to create greater meaning in our most important moments. And when we always try to look our very best.

Cheers!

The Truth About Creativity

Greetings. As many of you know, I spend a lot of time giving presentations and leading seminars on innovation, creativity, and unlocking the real genius in people at all levels of companies and organizations. And I have a strong belief that all of us have the innate ability to be way more innovative simply by being a bit more curious and open-minded about a world around us filled with remarkable people and awesome ideas and possibilities. In fact, this notion is at the heart of my newest book “The Necessity of Strangers.” So I was delighted when David Burkus invited me to be one of 30 guest “experts” in the upcoming “Truth About Creativity” virtual conference that begins on June 2nd at a computer or mobile device near you.

In the conference you will have the chance to discover insights for enhancing your own creative ability and driving even greater innovation in your company or organization through a series of fun and engaging 30-minute video interviews.  It promises to be a great learning experience that you can enjoy at your own pace and schedule.

You and your colleagues can sign up for this FREE (yes, FREE) event by simply following this link:

https://www.entheos.com/The-Truth-About-Creativity/Alan-Gregerman

I hope to see you there! Virtually, that is. And then I’ll look forward to having the chance to follow up and compare notes afterwards.

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And please feel free to share this link with any and all of your closest friends, colleagues, family members, neighbors, the folks on your softball team, the other parents on your childrens’ soccer and swimming teams, and even some total and partial strangers who might benefit from some of the latest thinking about innovation.

Cheers!

Connecting With Strangers

Greetings. Many of you have asked if you can listen to some of the ideas in “The Necessity of Strangers” and I’m glad to share this brand new and downloadable podcast from Vistage, one of the world’s leading organizations of CEOs and business owners. The podcast explores the importance of strangers in business success and suggests some fun, easy, and practical ways to connect with, and learn from, people (and organizations) that are different from us as a key to greater innovation, collaboration, employee engagement, and creativity.

Let me know what you think and, if you find the conversation valuable, please don’t hesitate to share it with all of your friends, colleagues, relatives, neighbors, customers, professionals you do business with, clergy, college roommates, yoga instructors, personal trainers, other parents on your child’s soccer, basketball, baseball, lacrosse, or swim teams, and even total strangers.

Vistage Podcast – The Necessity of Strangers

And here’s a smiling picture of me to look at while you listen…

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And many thanks to Vistage and to Srinivas Rao, thoughtful host of the Vistage podcasts, for giving me the opportunity to be part of this great series.

Cheers!

Finding Your Creativity

Greetings.  It’s a new week and a chance to unlock greater innovation in yourself and your organization.  And it might also be a good time to gain insight from a group of people who are constantly trying to be creative…and funny.  Yes, standup comedians.  Folks whose jobs depend on their special ability to earn laughs by finding humor in the world around us.  And a recent article by Samuel Bacharach in Inc. magazine provides helpful advice from the likes of John Cleese, Woody Allen, Jerry Seinfeld, Louis CK, and Ricky Gervais.

It’s a fun and quick read with a clear emphasis on the importance of play and playfulness, the value of testing new ideas and learning from “failure,” the logic of never being satisfied, the real potential for finding possibilities in the mundane, and the wisdom of revisiting old ideas for new insights and possibilities.

Important lessons for all of us as individuals and companies.  And important lessons for leaders charged with bringing out the real genius in all of their people.  Leaders who can get better results when they combine humor and humility.

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We win in business and in life when we take a fresh look at the simple and complex aspects of life.  And when we find humor in the most likely and unlikely places.

Cheers!